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Tips for focusing the front end and the back end of the subject in the same time.

We have a very good video with tips for setting the focal point/depth when shooting with a macro lens:

Here are the pictures which are obtained when shooting the video:

The focal depth (depth of field) is based on:
1. Distance from camera to object - the further away the more depth
2. Aperture (higher the number ex, 14 is longer then lower number ex. 10).

Now, double edge sword with aperture, as the higher the aperture number, the less clarity in photo. So we don't really suggest going about 13, preferably stay at 10. This causes us to have to move the camera back further to achieve a longer depth of field which in turn results in us cropping the image smaller - which means a smaller resolution image being captured which is fine (assuming you have a high megapixel camera) for focusing when shooting macro.

Step-by-step guide

We DO NOT use MF and the MF point adjustments in our software.

We either:
A. toggle from AF to MF to AF (to let the camera try and auto focus on the subject) and in this case, consider the AF point selection. I had changed this to manual point selection, we selected the middle focal point and made sure our subject was in the middle of the Live view cross hairs. Video:


Then, after we have let the camera on auto focus in Live View, and shot a 360 view, then we swap camera into MF to shoot (so it can use the same focal point). Or:
B. have customers manually twist their lens left and right (lens has to be in MF) this allows customers to adjust focal point by a very fine increment and that's a wrap.

The main steps are:

  1. Set the aperture at about 10
  2. Start with the camera close to the object and then slowly increase the distance between the camera and the object you shoot until you get the whole object focused

 

If you set the Aperture value too high (lower in our list of values from inside the software), the less clarity you get in photo. Increase the distance instead of setting the aperture at high values.

For more info about this, please go to: http://www.photopills.com/calculators/dof